Pineapple, Pumpkin, Passionfruit and Apricot Jam.

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Pssst, fancy something different, not too sweet, and VERY tangy and tasty on your morning toast?  You certainly can’t go past this easy-to-make, unusual Pineapple, Pumpkin, Passionfruit and Apricot Jam.  It looks good, and tastes even better!  Don’t use the pale, tiny, insipid dried apricots, though – this is worth lashing out on large deep orange dried apricots.

Pumpkin in jam?  Ask you mother or grandmother what they did during WW11,and the years of austerity after that! Put it this way – a friend in Dunedin said to me “I keep seeing trucks go into that preserves factory – and they’re full of swedes and pumpkins! There’s no swede jam around, is there?”

So I told her, and now you’ll know.   Swede and pumpkin have a certain natural sweetness to them, have the quality of going transparent when boiled, and are excellent as a “filler” for more expensive fruits in jams.

By the way, this jam tastes almost like tropical fruit salad (well, it would, wouldn’t it?) and apricots – totally yummy, and I usually double the recipe as everyone wants some!

Unusual, easy and very tangy – the Pineapple, Pumpkin, Passionfruit and Apricot Jam

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Ingredients

250g dried apricots chopped (big fat dark orange ones)

3.5 – 4 cups water

400g chopped pumpkin (approx 3 cups finely diced, even better – GRATED!)

1 kg jam setting sugar (or white sugar)

1/2 cup lemon juice

1/2 cup passionfruit pulp (or substitute with a small can of crushed pineapple)

OR add BOTH – I do!

Method

Soak chopped apricots in water overnight in a large pot.

In the same water and pot, boil the apricots and pumpkin for 20 minutes.

Add the jam setting sugar (or white sugar) and boil for 25 minutes.

Add lemon juice and passionfruit pulp, and pineapple.
Boil for 5 minutes.

Bottle while hot in sterilised jars. Cover when cold.

Pineapple, Pumpkin, Passionfruit and Apricot Jam.
Author: 
Recipe type: Preserves, Vegetarian, Breakfast
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
 
Fancy something different, not too sweet, and VERY tangy and tasty on your morning toast?  You certainly can't go past this easy-to-make, unusual Pineapple, Pumpkin, Passionfruit and Apricot Jam.  It looks good, and tastes even better!
Ingredients
  • 400g chopped pumpkin (approx 3 cups very finely diced, or just grated)
  • 250g dried apricots chopped or finely cut into strips with scissors
  • 3,5-4 cups water
  • 1 kg Jam setting sugar (or white sugar)
  • ½ cup lemon juice
  • ½ cup passionfruit pulp (or substitute with a small can of crushed pineapple)
  • (Or add both - I do!)
Method
  1. Soak chopped apricots in water overnight, in a large pot.
  2. In the same water boil the apricots and pumpkin for 20 minutes.
  3. Add the jam setting sugar, or white sugar
  4. Boil for another 25 minutes. Add lemon juice and passionfruit.
  5. Boil for 5 minutes.
  6. Bottle while hot in sterilised jars.
  7. Cover when cold.

The original came from Chelsea Sugar NZ, but has been altered to suit my taste.

 

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THREE LEMON CURDS for filling LEMON CUPCAKES

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Its always nice to have options when wanting a nice tart filling for cupcakes, or cakes, or a pavlova, or even to spread on toast, so here’s THREE LEMON CURDS for filling LEMON CUPCAKES

Three LEMON CURDS for filling lemon Cupcakes (my last post):

 

Pineapple Lemon Curd   (my favourite)

Makes 2 ½ cups of tangy filling, which is equally nice on toast or scones, or as a cake filling

Ingredients

12 cup sugar

1 Tablespoon cornflour/cornstarch

18 teaspoon salt

1cup pineapple juice (can be drained from can of pineapple in juice)

2 Tablespoons fresh lemon juice

3 large eggs (size 6 or 7)

2 Tablespoons butter

Method:

Combine the first 3 ingredients in a medium, heavy saucepan, stirring with a whisk.

Stir in juices and eggs; bring to a boil over medium heat, stirring constantly with a whisk.

Reduce heat, and simmer 1 minute or until thick, stirring constantly. Remove from heat; add butter, stirring gently until butter melts.

Spoon mixture into a medium bowl; cool. Cover and chill for at least 6 hours or overnight (the mixture will thicken as it cools).

This will last in the fridge for over a week.

Lemon Curd

Ingredients:
¼ cup lemon juice

¼ cup Chelsea Caster Sugar,

½ cup water,

1 Tablespoon cornflour mixed with 1 tablespoon water

1 egg yolk

Method:

Place the lemon juice, sugar and water in a small pan and gently heat, stirring until the sugar has dissolved.

Bring to a simmer and add the combined cornflour and water and cook for a further 2 minutes until the mixture is thick and bubbling.

Remove the pan from the heat and whisk in the egg yolk. Chill until the curd has cooled and thickened.

– See more at: http://www.chelsea.co.nz/browse-recipes/lemon-curd-cupcakes-lemon-buttercream/#sthash.387e1vmD.dpuf

Lemon & Passionfruit Curd

Ingredients:

2 cups sugar

125g butter

4 eggs

2 lemons

3 – 4 passionfruit

Method:

  1. Zest the skin of the lemons, avoiding the white bit, and strain the juice. Keep. Remove the passionfruit pulp.
  2. Into a bowl add the sugar, butter lemon zest, juice and passionfruit pulp. Beat the 4 eggs and add this, too, to the bowl.
  3. Over a double boiler, place the bowl and cook slowly stirring frequently until the curd is thick and smooth.
  4. Pour curd into hot, sterilised jars.

NOTE: All these recipes will keep in the fridge for 1-2 weeks

THREE LEMON CURDS for filling LEMON CUPCAKES
Author: 
Recipe type: baking, cakes, desserts, preserves
 
Three great LEMON CURD fillings - for cupcakes, cakes, pavlova, or as a spread on toast
Ingredients
  • Pineapple Lemon Curd (my favourite)
  • Makes 2 ½ cups of tangy filling, which is equally nice on toast or scones, or as a cake filling
  • Ingredients
  • 1⁄2 cup sugar
  • 1 Tablespoon cornflour/cornstarch
  • 1⁄8 teaspoon salt
  • 1cup pineapple juice (can be drained from can of pineapple in juice)
  • 2 Tablespoons fresh lemon juice
  • 3 large eggs (size 6 or 7)
  • 2 Tablespoons butter
  • Method:
  • Combine the first 3 ingredients in a medium, heavy saucepan, stirring with a whisk.
  • Stir in juices and eggs; bring to a boil over medium heat, stirring constantly with a whisk.
  • Reduce heat, and simmer 1 minute or until thick, stirring constantly. Remove from heat; add butter, stirring gently until butter melts.
  • Spoon mixture into a medium bowl; cool. Cover and chill for at least 6 hours or overnight (the mixture will thicken as it cools).
  • This will last in the fridge for over a week.
  • Lemon Curd
  • Ingredients:
  • ¼ cup lemon juice
  • ¼ cup Chelsea Caster Sugar,
  • ½ cup water,
  • 1 Tablespoon cornflour mixed with 1 tablespoon water
  • 1 egg yolk
  • Method:
  • Place the lemon juice, sugar and water in a small pan and gently heat, stirring until the sugar has dissolved.
  • Bring to a simmer and add the combined cornflour and water and cook for a further 2 minutes until the mixture is thick and bubbling.
  • Remove the pan from the heat and whisk in the egg yolk. Chill until the curd has cooled and thickened.
  • - See more at: http://www.chelsea.co.nz/browse-recipes/lemon-curd-cupcakes-lemon-buttercream/#sthash.387e1vmD.dpuf
  • Lemon & Passionfruit Curd
  • Ingredients:
  • 2 cups sugar
  • 125g butter
  • 4 eggs
  • 2 lemons
  • 3 – 4 passionfruit
  • Method:
  • Zest the skin of the lemons, avoiding the white bit, and strain the juice. Keep. Remove the passionfruit pulp.
  • Into a bowl add the sugar, butter lemon zest, juice and passionfruit pulp. Beat the 4 eggs and add this, too, to the bowl.
  • Over a double boiler, place the bowl and cook slowly stirring frequently until the curd is thick and smooth.
  • Pour curd into hot, sterilised jars.

 

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Make your own APPLE CIDER VINEGAR

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Hi there, friends!   I bring an Apple Cider Vinegar recipe, and apologies – I’m sorry it’s been such a long time since my last post, but ill health, then being unable to access my blog, held me back.  Enough of the bad stuff…!

I’ve changed to a new web host now, and have so much to share with you all.   First I’ll show some recent cakes I’ve made, and over coming weeks I’ll give the recipes for the cakes I’ve found best, and my favorite cup cakes, amongst many other goodies that have been stored up.

My own Easter cake – a loaf – cut, showing the “egg” inside. I knew this one wasn’t perfect, so kept it for myself.

Easter loaf-01

My own Easter cake

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Some of my Easter baking – these were for gifts

Mum’s Easter cake – with an “egg” in every slice.

Easter muffins for my sister’s grandchildren

A Funfetti cake for my sister’s grandchildren

Here in New Zealand it’s now well into Autumn, with gorgeous long, clear, golden days along with the cooler nights. I went up to McLarens Falls Lake with my friend Maree C. today, and these are some of the lovely pictures she took.  The park was an old farm, and the lake was formed in 1925 to provide electrical power for the then town of Tauranga.  It’s full of gorgeous elderly imported, largely deciduous trees (oaks, chestnuts, etc), mixed with areas of native New Zealand bush – serene and beautiful, and so close to home.

Lake McLaren, McLaren Falls Park, Tauranga

Because it’s Autumn here, there so much largesse to deal with, so it’s been Quince paste (recipe in here), jams and chutneys, and today I put my own APPLE CIDER VINEGAR to bed to rest for about 2 months before it gets bottled.

The recipe is sooooo easy, it’s so inexpensive to make, and it’s sooooo good for you – what’s not to like?

Give it a go – what have you got to lose, and everything to gain!   Because it’s a while until bottling, the only pic I can show is the stages before straining, and how that looks – hence all the other pix for you.

Apple Cider Vinegar:

(with thanks to Jean Gwatkin & NZ Gardener’s Homegrown magazine: The notes in the magazine include that Jean uses Granny Smith or Sturmer apples, because that’s what she has in her back yard, though she says any variety will do. The juicy varieties are best. I use Braeburn, usually.)

Apple Cider Vinegar – In the bucket – the day made, the crusting after 4 days, and after stirring at 4 days.

The ingredients are simple:

“Enough apples to fill a ordinary plastic bucket”, and 3 cups white sugar and half a bucket of boiled water, cooled. Yes, that’s it!

The method:

  1. Sterilise your bucket (I use Campden tablets)
  2. Boil enough water to half fill a plastic bucket. Let cool.
  3. Wash, chop and roughly process the apples in a food processor – skins, cores and all – and add to the bucket until they’re level with the water.
  4. Cover with a cloth or loose lid and stir daily for a week.
  5. At the end of the week, strain and add the sugar to the liquid.
  6. Pour into a clean bucket and leave in a cool cupboard for two months. (I loosely cover with a teatowel).
  7. When the ‘Mother’ (a sort of leathery translucent skin) forms on top of the liquid, your cider vinegar is ready to strain and bottle… and enjoy.
  8. NOTES:
  9. * Use organic, unsprayed, apples, and you have the best apple cider vinegar you can’t buy, made by yourself!
    * Remember to sterilise your buckets and bottles – you can buy Campden or similar tablets from Bin Inn or home brew places for this.
    * This is sooo simple and inexpensive to make, so good for your health, so useful in cookery, and great for gifts… what more could you want?

Make your own APPLE CIDER VINEGAR
Author: 
Recipe type: preserves
Cuisine: Foraging
Prep time: 
Total time: 
Serves: several litres
 
A very simple and inexpensive way to make your own Apple Cider Vinegar, from three ingredients - apples, sugar and boiled water! It's good for your health, too, so there's a bonus. You can use windfall apples or bought ones, but ones you know have no spray are by far the best.
Ingredients
  • Apple Cider Vinegar: with thanks to Jean Gwatkin & NZ Gardener's Homegrown magazine: The notes in the magazine include that Jean uses Granny Smith or Sturmer apples, because that's what she has in her back yard, though she says any variety will do. The juicy varieties are best. I use Braeburn, usually.
  • The ingredients are simple:
  • "Enough apples to fill a ordinary plastic bucket”, and 3 cups white sugar and half a bucket of boiled water, cooled. Yes, that’s it!
Method
  1. Sterilise your bucket (I use Campden tablets)
  2. Boil enough water to half fill a plastic bucket. Let cool.
  3. Wash, chop and roughly process the apples in a food processor - skins, cores and all - and add to the bucket until they're level with the water.
  4. Cover with a cloth or loose lid and stir daily for a week.
  5. At the end of the week, strain and add the sugar to the liquid.
  6. Pour into a clean bucket and leave in a cool cupboard for two months. (I loosely cover with a teatowel).
  7. When the 'Mother' (a sort of leathery translucent skin) forms on top of the liquid, your cider vinegar is ready to strain and bottle... and enjoy..
  8. NOTES:
  9. * Use organic, unsprayed, apples, and you have the best apple cider vinegar you can't buy, made by yourself!
  10. * Remember to sterilise your buckets and bottles - you can buy Campden or similar tablets from Bin Inn or home brew places for this.
  11. * This is sooo simple and inexpensive to make, so good for your health, so useful in cookery, and great for gifts... what more could you want?

 

 

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Persimmon Marmalade

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Not sweet, not sour, this Persimmon Marmalade is not a traditional marmalade, but does have a most wonderful citrus marmalade flavour. Delicious with a hot crusty croissant – or on toast, muffin, pancake or scone.  I mean, why stint yourself?

Persimmon"Marmalade" - not a traditional recipe, but a wonderful citrusy flavour!

Persimmon Marmalade – not a traditional recipe, but a wonderful citrusy flavour!

Modern seedless Persimmon fruit

Modern seedless Persimmon fruit

persimmon marmalade - the citrus mix all cut and ready for the pot

persimmon marmalade – the citrus mix all cut and ready for the pot

persimmon marmalade - persimmon and citrus about to simmer

persimmon marmalade – persimmon and citrus about to simmer

 

Persimmon Marmalade
Author: 
Recipe type: Preserves, jam
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: varies
 
Not sweet, not sour, this Persimmon Marmalade is not a traditional marmalade, but does have a most wonderful citrus marmalade flavour. Delicious with a hot crusty croissant – or on toast, muffin, pancake or scone. I mean, why stint yourself?
Ingredients
  • 700 g (approx 1 lb 7½ oz) thin -skinned oranges
  • 300 g (approx 10 oz) limes (or lemons)
  • 1 kg (2.2 lb) ripe but firm persimmons
  • 6 cups water (1 ½ litres)
  • 4 cups sugar
Method
  1. Wash all the fruit but don’t peel.
  2. Slice the oranges and limes or lemons thinly then into small (4mm) pieces. It’s important only that the skins of the citrus are not too chunky. I used a pair of scissors I keep for kitchen use to cut up the fine slices into little chnks.
  3. Chop the persimmons roughly then pulse in a processor until chopped but not pureed – it should look coarsely grated.
  4. Place all ingredients in a large heavy bottomed pot and bring to simmer point over a medium-high heat.
  5. Simmer for 1 ½ - 2 hours or until the mixture is reduced by about half and has thickened to a jam-like consistency.
  6. Remove from heat, bottle and seal.

As an aside, with a giggle, from Autumn:

The kitchen smelled divine throughout the entire process!  Wonderful citrus-y odours from the start of slicing and zesting, through to the bottling.

The really funny thing is – I tried this recipe as I was going to re-try an old recipe for Marmalade Cake, and found I was out of marmalade…….

Well, guess what!  I nearly am again!  Friends have tasted it, and each has taken off with a bottle or so, from the two batches I made……   And breakfast toast just isn’t going to be the same, once this batch runs out!

What a pity the persimmon season is so short!

Bookmark this recipe for next season, for sure!

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PERSIMMON JAM

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This PERSIMMON JAM recipe makes great use of a small amount of this luscious fruit that has a relatively short season.  It is a lovely exotic flavour, with a great texture, and a real change from the usual fruit and berry jams.

The new types of persimmons are mostly seedless, and beautifully fleshy fruits, but you can still make this delightful jam with the old- fashioned type, too – I’ve tested it on both.  The yield is small (3-6 jars, depending on the size of yours!), but is well worth the effort!

Persimmon Jam - a delicious, exotic, easy-to-make treat.

Persimmon Jam – a delicious, exotic, easy-to-make treat.

Modern seedless Persimmon fruit

Modern seedless Persimmon fruit

PERSIMMON JAM
Author: 
Recipe type: Preserves, jams
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: varies
 
This PERSIMMON JAM recipe uses a small amount of fruit, has a lovely exotic flavour, with a great texture, and a real change from the usual fruit and berry jams. The yield is small (3-6 jars, depending on the size of yours!), but is well worth the effort!
Ingredients
  • 5 largish persimmons – peeled and chopped into dice
  • 1 ½ cups sugar
  • 1 Tablespoon vanilla extract
  • 1 Tablespoon grated lemon zest
  • 1 ½ Tablespoon lemon juice
Method
  1. Add the peeled and chopped fruit to a very heavy-based pot and add the sugar and vanilla.
  2. Leave to stand for about 5 minutes, to allow juices to run a little.
  3. Put the pot onto a high heat and stir constantly until thickened and jam-like – about 25 to 30 minutes.
  4. Add the lemon zest, cook about 3 minutes longer (still stirring constantly) to allow the zest to turn clear.
  5. Now add the lemon juice, stir thoroughly, then remove from heat and pour into pre-sterilised jars and seal.

I have an equally delicious PERSIMMON MARMALADE, which also uses a small amount of fruit, that is worth a try, too

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QUINCE PASTE

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QUINCE PASTE

A delicious Quince fruit paste, made from a wonderful old-fashioned fruit – a wonderful aroma, and an amazing fruit pate to accompany a glass of wine and a good sharp or blue cheese!

A continuation, in printable form, from THE ONE QUINCE RECIPE TO RULE THEM ALL…

QUINCE PASTE

The wonderful quince

The wonderful quince

QUINCE PASTE
Author: 
Recipe type: Preserves, vegetarian
Serves: varies
 
A wonderful paste to serve with cheese, cracker and a glass of good wine
Ingredients
  • Use the cooked flesh from the recipe given in THE ONE QUINCE RECIPE TO RULE THEM ALL.
Method
  1. You can use all (or part) of the solids (the fruit you used, either whole, halved or quartered, in the crockpot).
  2. Now remove the skins, cores and any blemishes.
  3. Either blitz with a stick blender or in a kitchen wizz (food processor) until smooth.
  4. Place into a smaller crockpot with a cup of sugar for every cup of pulp.
  5. Cook on low, uncovered, until a deep rich pink and very thick – “until a wooden spoon leaves a line through the mixture”.
  6. If you wish, when it’s getting really thick, hasten the process by putting into a LARGE pyrex microwave bowl.
  7. Using 3 minute bursts on high in the microwave, stirring halfway through each, cook until VERY thick.
  8. This avoids all the "blobs" of boiling sugary pulp of old-fashioned methods!
  9. When cooled a little, spoon into small containers, leave until cool, and seal.
  10. Serve with cheese, crackers and wine.
  11. Suitable 200ml (microwavable) containers for storing your paste are now available at Countdown supermarkets, smaller ones at K-Mart, so look around – they will take the hot paste without melting, and store it well.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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QUINCE JELLY

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QUINCE JELLY

Quince Jelly is a wonderfully perfumed preserve to have on buttered scones (biscuits, in the USA) for an indulgent morning or afternoon tea – or even your breakfast toast!

A continuation of THE ONE QUINCE RECIPE TO RULE THEM ALL, this time in printable form.

Yummy - Home made quince jelly

Yummy – Home made quince jelly

The wonderful quince

The wonderful quince

QUINCE JELLY
Author: 
Recipe type: preserves, vegetarian
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: varies
 
An easy way to make Quince Jelly (following on from the method given in THE ONE QUINCE RECIPE TO RULE THEM ALL)
Ingredients
  • Use the liquid from the recipe given in THE ONE QUINCE RECIPE TO RULE THEM ALL.
Method
  1. Lay a clean tea towel over a strainer over a large pot.
  2. Strain the liquid from the crockpot through the cloth and strainer into the pot.
  3. Bring to the boil, boil until jammy (at least 15 minutes).
  4. Check for setting ability after it’s boiled for a while.
  5. Bottle and seal (see Autumn's culinary Tips).
  6. Autumn's Culinary Tips: I sometimes add a little lemon or lime juice if I think it needs it, then bottle and seal when drops on a cold saucer in the fridge show clear signs of setting.
  7. If you think it needs it, add an extra cup of jam setting sugar to help things along….
  8. Jam setting sugar (with extra pectin) is available in most supermarkets these days.

 

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THE ONE QUINCE RECIPE TO RULE THEM ALL….. easiest Quince recipe EVER!

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The wonderful quince

The wonderful quince

 

The Easiest Quince Recipe – Ever!       

Multiple ways to use a few quinces, from one basic – very easy – recipe.

 

 

PERFECT QUINCES

This is the original recipe – I now do this overnight, in the crockpot – so easy!

******   Original recipe (from an private messageboard):

Wash quinces well and place in a saucepan. 
Add cup for cup sugar and water, and pour over to a depth of about 2 inches.
 
boil gently for ??? (several) hours. I can’t remember the time.
 

You can tell when it’s ready though, the sugar/water mix will have gone a beautiful colour                                

 from the juices boiled out of the quinces, and will coat the back of a spoon.   

Lift the quinces out very carefully so they don’t break up in the water.

Pour the water mix into jars where it will set perfectly.  

Eat the quinces with cream, or custard for dessert.  Or use in muffins.

******

You can tell why I don’t do this any more!

THIS is what I do now…….

THE ONE QUINCE RECIPE TO RULE THEM ALL.....
Author: 
Recipe type: preserves, vegetarian
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: varies
 
One method, multiple uses, for quinces - a wonderful medieval fruit with amazing scent and flavour
Ingredients
  • Quinces (unpeeled, bad spots removed)
  • Sugar
  • water
  • juice 2-3 lemons
Method
  1. For my large oval crockpot, I manage to get 5 large and 3 smaller quinces into it whole or standing on their ends, or a heap more cut into halves.
  2. No need to core or peel them, just cut out any major blemishes, bruises or rotten bits.
  3. (If you have a smaller crockpot, just fill it as you can, adjust sugar water to fit)
  4. Add cup for cup sugar and water to come halfway up fruit (usually and 2.5 - 4 cups each of sugar and water - can always reduce at the end, in a pot, so no worries) and the juice of 2 -3 lemons, depending how tart you like your jelly..
  5. Follow basic recipe, use cooked quince flesh as desired after.
  6. They can be frozen to use in muffins or desserts later in the year, when fruit is scarce, or made into paste, or simply served with custard.
  7. I set it up, before going to bed (around midnight – 1 am), by giving it a burst on high until bubbles start to rise, then turn it to warm
  8. (I use the largest crockpot, which has this facility), then turn it to warm, and in the morning it’s ready to lift out (VERY carefully!) the whole quinces (I use TWO ladles for each).
  9. Set the fruit onto a plate to cool a little. Peel the skins off, and core them.
  10. RESERVE LIQUID - this is liquid gold!

USING ALL THE CONTENTS OF YOUR QUINCE CROCKPOT

See the next recipes, for QUINCE JELLYQUINCE PASTE, and QUINCE TARTE TARTIN (in printable form)

QUINCE JELLY:

Strain the liquid through a fine strainer into a pot, bring to the boil, check for setting ability after it’s boiled for a while.

I sometimes add a little lemon or lime juice if I think it needs it, then bottle and seal when drops on a cold saucer in the fridge show clear signs of setting.  If you think it needs it, add an extra cup of jam setting sugar to help things along….  Jam setting sugar (with extra pectin) is available in most supermarkets these days).

QUINCE PASTE:

You can use all (or part) of the solids (the fruit  you used, either while, halved ir quartered, in the crockpot).

With the skins, cores and any blemishes removed, either blitz with a stick blender or in a kitchen wiz and put into a smaller crockpot with a cup of sugar for every cup of pulp.

Cook on low, uncovered, until a deep rich pink and very thick – “until a wooden spoon leaves a line through the mixture”.

If you wish, when it’s getting really thick, hasten the process by putting into a LARGE pyrex microwave bowl and use 3 minute bursts on high in the microwave, stirring halfway through each, until VERY thick, then spoon into small pottles, leave until cool, and seal.  Serve with cheese, crackers and wine.

Suitable 200ml (microwavable) containers for storing your paste are now available at Countdown supermarkets, smaller ones at K-Mart, so look around – they will take the hot paste without melting, and store it well.

And now, look for my next recipe…. QUINCE TARTE TARTIN in DESSERTS.

The easiest fruit dessert, ever….!

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